AUBAGIO® patient, Kani AUBAGIO® patient, Kani

Meet
Kani

Diagnosed with relapsing
MS in 1999.

Kani, a fitness instructor and lover of exercise, doesn't let the diagnosis of relapsing MS stop her from finding ways to keep moving.

Individual experiences may vary.

Text Version

AUBAGIO 14 MG

Please see Important Safety Information toward the end of this video.

Kani's Story

Actual AUBAGIO patient who has been compensated by Sanofi Genzyme. Individual experiences may vary.

My name is Kani, and I live in New Hampshire.

I take AUBAGIO 14 mg for my relapsing remitting MS.

I am 48 years old.

I am a pension plan communications analyst. But on the side, I'm also a fitness instructor.

I am very passionate about movement and exercise.

But at the same time, it's also being able to find the ability to zen it down. So it's a full circle.

It's quiet time where I just get in touch with myself and realize, you know, the benefit of who I am.

I was diagnosed with relapsing remitting MS in 1999 at the age of 33.

In 1999, Kani was diagnosed with relapsing MS.

The diagnosis came about as a result of a very bad headache that I had for a couple of weeks. So I went to my doctor and he had a CAT scan done.

I brought it to the neurologist, and he immediately suggested I have an MRI.

My MRI showed lesions.

And when I went back to get the results, he started with some questions. "Do you have any issues with your balance, coordination, concentration?"

On the MRI, he saw these lesions on my brain that were indicative of multiple sclerosis.

Because I didn't have any of the symptoms that in my mind I knew to be prevalent with MS, I just focused on living life. And I was getting married at that time. So I had a wedding to plan.

If I had to describe MS in one word, I would call it bizarre.

There's not one particular common denominator I have with my peers who have MS other than we have MS. We all have different symptoms, different reactions.

I couldn't handle needles.

I learned about AUBAGIO because I am needle phobic.

I was on another oral medication, and I was on it for a little while, but I experienced an unrelated neurological event. So, I stopped taking it.

I decided to take AUBAGIO because it was a daily pill.

The benefit of it being a daily pill was very, very appealing to me.

I was a little concerned perhaps that I might have the side effect of the GI issues.

Individual experiences may vary.

And I also was a little concerned that I might have potential hair thinning. But neither were strong enough to prevent me from taking AUBAGIO.

Before taking AUBAGIO, I had a pregnancy test, a TB test, and the liver enzymes test.

Speak to your doctor about monitoring requirements for the first 6 months of taking AUBAGIO.

After I started, I did have for a couple of weeks a mild bout of the GI issues—but I knew it was coming, and it wasn't permanent. It lasted for about three or four weeks.

Individual experiences may vary.

And then about in the third month of taking AUBAGIO, I started to experience the hair thinning. My solution was pull my bangs up off my head.

It did start growing back in probably around month six.

The most common side effects when taking AUBAGIO include: headache; diarrhea; nausea; hair thinning or loss; and abnormal liver test results. These are not all the side effects of AUBAGIO. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you.

Why stay with AUBAGIO?

I've had one MRI so far, and it was music to my ears when my neurologist said, "You have no new lesions."

Individual experiences may vary.

I feel comfortable administering AUBAGIO after so many years of not taking any MS medication.

Start by talking.

I would say to other people with MS who are considering taking AUBAGIO, "Sit down and have a good discussion with your doctor, and learn about the benefits of the medication and the side effects. And then I would also suggest you speak to the MS One to One® Nurse."

They were phenomenal for me. They were able to help me before I even became an AUBAGIO patient and give me some tips and things to consider prior to going on AUBAGIO. And, when I did start AUBAGIO, I got the monthly phone call to remind me to have my liver enzymes checked, and just checking to see how I was doing.

My mantra to MS: "I may have MS, but MS does not have me."

Thank you for watching Kani's story.

AUBAGIO is available in 14 MG and 7 MG tablets SANOFI GENZYME

Ask your healthcare provider if AUBAGIO is right for you.

© 2016 Genzyme Corporation. Sanofi and AUBAGIO are registered trademarks of Sanofi. Genzyme is a registered trademark of Genzyme Corporation. All rights reserved.

GZUS.AUBA.15.03.0935(1)a(1) July 2016

Learn about AUBAGIO® events Check out
AUBAGIO Events

Get facts and answers about relapsing MS, AUBAGIO, and more.

Learn more

Share your relapsing MS story Tell your story

Everyone on AUBAGIO has a story. Let's hear yours.

Learn more

INDICATION

AUBAGIO® (teriflunomide) is a prescription medicine used to treat relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS).

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

DO NOT TAKE AUBAGIO IF YOU:

  • Have severe liver problems. AUBAGIO may cause serious liver problems, which can be life-threatening. Your risk may be higher if you take other medicines that affect your liver. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check your liver within 6 months before you start AUBAGIO and monthly for 6 months after starting AUBAGIO. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop any of these symptoms of liver problems: nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, loss of appetite, tiredness, yellowing of your skin or whites of your eyes, or dark urine.
  • Are pregnant. AUBAGIO may harm an unborn baby. You should have a pregnancy test before starting AUBAGIO. After stopping AUBAGIO, continue to use effective birth control until you have made sure your blood levels of AUBAGIO are lowered. If you become pregnant while taking AUBAGIO or within 2 years after stopping, tell your healthcare provider right away and enroll in the AUBAGIO Pregnancy Registry at 1‑800‑745‑4447, option 2.
  • Are of childbearing potential and not using effective birth control.

It is not known if AUBAGIO passes into breast milk. Your healthcare provider can help you decide if you should take AUBAGIO or breastfeed — you should not do both at the same time.

If you are a man whose partner plans to become pregnant, you should stop taking AUBAGIO and talk with your healthcare provider about reducing the levels of AUBAGIO in your blood. If your partner does not plan to become pregnant, use effective birth control while taking AUBAGIO.

  • Have had an allergic reaction to AUBAGIO or a medicine called leflunomide.
  • Take a medicine called leflunomide for rheumatoid arthritis.

AUBAGIO may stay in your blood for up to 2 years after you stop taking it. Your healthcare provider can prescribe a medicine that can remove AUBAGIO from your blood quickly.

Before taking AUBAGIO, talk with your healthcare provider if you have: liver or kidney problems; a fever or infection, or if you are unable to fight infections; numbness or tingling in your hands or feet that is different from your MS symptoms; diabetes; serious skin problems when taking other medicines; breathing problems; or high blood pressure. Your healthcare provider will check your blood cell count and TB test before you start AUBAGIO. Talk with your healthcare provider if you take or are planning to take other medicines (especially medicines for treating cancer or controlling your immune system), vitamins or herbal supplements.

AUBAGIO may cause serious side effects, including: reduced white blood cell count — this may cause you to have more infections; numbness or tingling in your hands or feet that is different from your MS symptoms; allergic reactions, including serious skin problems; breathing problems (new or worsening); and high blood pressure. Patients with low white blood cell count should not receive certain vaccinations during AUBAGIO treatment and 6 months after.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

The most common side effects when taking AUBAGIO include: headache; diarrhea; nausea; hair thinning or loss; and abnormal liver test results. These are not all the side effects of AUBAGIO. Tell your healthcare provider about any side effect that bothers you.

Consult your healthcare provider if you have questions about your health or any medications you may be taking, including AUBAGIO.

You are encouraged to report side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1‑800‑FDA‑1088.

Please click here for full Prescribing Information, including boxed WARNING and Medication Guide.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION
Do not take AUBAGIO if you have severe liver problems. AUBAGIO may cause serious liver problems, which can be life-threatening. Your risk may be higher if you take other medicines that affect your liver. View More